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Flood Prone Zones

  • Can I hunt other wildlife?

    Yes. 
    Flood Prone Zone closures only affect deer hunting in the zone closed. All other hunting and fishing opportunities remain open. 

  • Why is deer hunting closed during high water?

    The bottomland habitats of eastern Arkansas offer excellent habitat for large deer populations, but these low-lying areas also can become inundated quickly, pushing deer into smaller areas with less available cover. This creates a situation where deer may become vulnerable to overharvest, and removes some of the aspects of fair chase. Hunting in flooded areas also increases the chances of game loss as fatally hit deer may run into swift-moving stream or deep areas before hunters can recover their harvest.  

  • Will I be refunded for any license or permit fees?

    No. The $5 application fee for permit hunts on WMAs are nontransferrable and nonrefundable. Hunting licenses also are nontransferrable and nonrefundable. 

  • When is the decision to close or open a flood prone zone made? When does it officially close or open to deer hunting?

    AGFC biologists monitor set river gauges periodically throughout the day and make a determination at 3 p.m. to close or open a flood prone zone. The closure of a zone becomes effective 24 hours after that decision is made (3 p.m. the next day). An area opens to deer hunting again immediately on the established river gauges reaching the opening criteria (no 24-hour delay is necessary).  

  • Can I archery hunt during a flood prone zone closure?

    No. All deer hunting, no matter which method used, is closed during flood prone zone closures.

  • Do hunters approve of flood prone zones?

    The AGFC routinely has ouside vendors perform hunter attitude surveys to gauge people's thoughts on various hunting regulations. The last such survey was performed via email in 2018. Accoridn to that survey, 60 percent of hunters were in favor of flood prone zone closures with current criteria, and 15 percent opposed them. 

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