Site Menu
News

Read Arkansas Wildlife magazine for free

April 15, 2020

LITTLE ROCK — If you’re looking for something to keep that outdoor fire burning while staying your distance from others, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has you covered. Every issue of Arkansas Wildlife magazine produced during the last year is now available free.

Birds of prey popular option for winter wildlife viewing

Feb. 19, 2020

LITTLE ROCK - Watchable wildlife is typically thought of as a spring and summer endeavor, but there are plenty of reasons to don a coat and get outside during winter as well. Many of the more colorful migratory birds will be making their way back north in the next few months, but birds of prey are the featured attraction right now.

Saline County landowners burn their way to better habitat

Sept. 4, 2019

BENTON – Some Arkansas private landowners aim to restore part of their acreage to experience quail or turkey hunting they may have enjoyed decades ago. Other landowners, though, may not be focused on hunting. They may just want a plan to dispense with nonnative grasses and Chinese privet dominating their land and turn those acres over to native plants more conducive to wildlife – not just quail or turkey, but the all-important pollinators and what is termed “watchable” wildlife.

Birds, butterflies and nature buffs drawn to wildflowers at Grandview Prairie

May 22, 2019

COLUMBUS, ARKANSAS -- Mother Nature can rival the most intensively managed flowerbed with her own displays of prairie flowers popping at Rick Evans Grandview Prairie Wildlife Management Area.

Monarch butterfly sees population rebound

May 15, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — For the first time in 12 years, eastern monarch populations are up significantly. The overwintering monarch population numbers, released by the World Wildlife Fund in Mexico, show the highest numbers since 2007. 
 

Keep feeders clean to reduce chance of disease in backyard birds

Jan. 23, 2019

LITTLE ROCK – Birdwatchers may notice an increase in the amount of finches visiting their feeders this winter, and with that comes the possibility of a certain bacterial infection that can affect the birds’ eyes.

Louisiana-released whooping crane enjoys layover in The Natural State

Jan. 9, 2019

STUTTGART — A rare visitor from the coastal marshes took an extended break in Arkansas during the first two segments of duck season this year. A whooping crane, one of the most recognized birds listed on the federal list of endangered species, spent the last three months bouncing around east Arkansas, primarily in fields between Roe and Aberdeen in western Monroe County.