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Early teal season offers first chance for Arkansas duck hunters

Sept. 13, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — Sunday marks the first shot hunters have at taking a duck his year, and it’s a tricky shot at that. The early teal season is open Sept. 15-30, so hunters can have an opportunity to harvest some of these small ducks that typically migrate before the rest of the crowd.

Waterfowl hunting dates for nonresidents on Arkansas wildlife management areas available

July 29, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — Nonresident waterfowl hunters will be able to hunt some of Arkansas’s most popular public waterfowl-hunting destinations Nov. 23-Dec. 2; Dec. 27-Jan. 5; and Jan. 22-31 this season. 
 

Ducks Unlimited honors Boozman, Ronquest for achievements in wetland conservation

March 13, 2019

DENVER – Two Arkansans were honored at Friday’s North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference by Ducks Unlimited for their work in promoting and conserving North America’s wetlands and waterfowl. Senator John Boozman and Jim Ronquest, producer of Rich-N-Tone videos, were recognized with two of the six awards DU presented.

Watch flightlines when scouting WMAs for ducks

Jan. 9, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — It may sound simple enough to the everyday WMA waterfowl hunter, but to the newcomer or the not-so-veteran waterfowler using public land, scouting the area for ducks is best accomplished by watching how groups of ducks are flying from a resting area, according to Luke Naylor, the AGFC's waterfowl program coordinator.

Take the Hunter’s Pledge with the AGFC

Oct. 31, 2018

LITTLE ROCK - As the modern gun youth deer hunt begins, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission would like to remind all hunters to take a moment to think about introducing a new hunter this year. In fact, we are asking hunters to “take the pledge,” so to speak, and become a mentor.  
 

Forest thinning important tool for wildlife management

June 28, 2017

That ancient oak standing amongst a crowded forest canopy may look like the perfect magnet for deer, but that tree may not be the best use of space for wildlife in the long run. Selectively removing some damaged, old and less productive trees is part of healthy forest management and necessary to begin the next generation of forest for our children to enjoy.