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Bear hunters needed to provide research samples

Oct. 13, 2021

SPRINGDALE — The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission is asking anyone who harvests a bear in the Ouachita Mountains or Ozarks to consider helping collect valuable samples from their bear to help research an increased occurrence of mange in the Ozark bear population.

Don’t ‘treat’ wildlife like livestock

Aug. 18, 2021

LITTLE ROCK — As summer progresses and people begin to see deer more frequently in the open, many of the deer they witness will be seen with ticks or bare spots in their fur from scratching at parasites on the skin. It’s human nature to want to help, but according to Dr. Jenn Ballard, state wildlife veterinarian for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, treating free-ranging wildlife is rarely effective and can cause many more troubles than it prevents.

Arkansas rabbit disease detection retracted

April 14, 2021

LITTLE ROCK — The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has been notified that the detection of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus in northeast Arkansas was made in error and has been retracted.

Rabbit disease spotted in Arkansas

April 7, 2021

JONESBORO — The Arkansas Department of Agriculture has identified The Natural State’s first positive case of a fatal rabbit disease in a domestic rabbit in northeast Arkansas. 

Don’t be a superspreader; keep bird feeders clean

March 17, 2021

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission would like to remind everyone to take the time to keep bird feeders clean and prevent the spread of diseases among the feathered friends you are trying to help. 

Rice breast in ducks unsightly but no cause for alarm

Dec. 9, 2020

LITTLE ROCK — Talk about rice in Arkansas, and the relationship to ducks and duck hunting isn’t far behind. One type of “rice” hunters may discover when duck hunting has nothing to do with Arkansas’s favorite grain, and often fuels calls to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s biologists and wildlife health line.

Fungal infection on sport fish no cause for alarm

Nov. 25, 2020

As the weather cools, and many outdoors enthusiasts begin to put away their boats for winter, some are cashing in on the solitude and lower fishing pressure on their favorite lake. But as their catch rates increase, so do their chances of catching some fish that may be a bit unsightly. Many anglers send in photos to fisheries biologists and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Facebook page this time of year with bass or crappie that look like they’ve got a bad case of acne.