Trout Program | Where to Fish for Trout 

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Beaver Lake Tailwater

Background
Beaver Dam is on the White River in Carroll County. The dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control and hydroelectric power generation and was the last project to be constructed on the White River. Commercial power generation began in May 1965, although the project was not officially completed until 1966. The resulting tailwater flows about 7.5 miles through northwest Arkansas before entering Table Rock Lake. Coldwater releases from Beaver Dam created habitat that was less suitable for native sport fish. The AGFC began stocking trout in 1966 to mitigate the loss.

Management Plan
In 2005, the AGFC Trout Management Program developed a comprehensive management plan for the tailwater. The plan was established specific goals and objectives, which guide the management of the fishery. Intensive public involvement was central to the plan to ensure the desires and expectations of the angling public were embodied. The plan will be revisited in 2011 to determine if management objectives were met and ensure plan goals are still in line with public values and interests. As part of the continuing effort to maximize public involvement, anglers and other stakeholders will be given several opportunities in 2011 to provide input on the management of the fishery for the next five years. The first in a series of public workshops was held on March 1, 2011. Anglers are encouraged to attend a second public workshop at 6:30 p.m., May 17, in the Walmart Auditorium of the Shewmaker Center for Workforce and Technology at Northwest Arkansas Community College in Bentonville.


Bull Shoals Tailwater

Background
Bull Shoals Dam was constructed on the White River in 1952 for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. As with other dams in the southeastern United States, operations from this project created coldwater habitat unsuitable for native fish species. Experimental stockings of rainbow trout and brown trout demonstrated exceptional survival and growth. Regular stockings of these two species began in 1955. The AGFC currently manages trout fisheries in the White River from Bull Shoals Dam to the Arkansas Highway 58 Bridge at Guion.

Management Plan
In 2007, the AGFC Trout Management Program began developing a comprehensive management plan for both the Bull Shoals and Norfork tailwaters. The purpose of this plan is to establish specific goals and objectives, which will guide future management of the trout fisheries in these waters. Central to the plan development process was an intensive public involvement effort used to help ensure the desires and expectations of the angling public were embodied. In 2013, this plan will be revisited to determine if management objectives were met and to ensure that plan goals are still in line with public values and interests.


Greers Ferry Lake Tailwater

Background
Greers Ferry Dam is on the Little Red River in Cleburne County. The dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. Commercial power generation began in July 1964. The resulting trout waters of Greers Ferry tailwater flow about 30 miles through central Arkansas. Coldwater discharge from Greers Ferry Dam created coldwater habitat that was less suitable for native sportfish species. The AGFC began stocking trout into Greers Ferry Tailwater in 1966 to mitigate the loss. Rainbow trout were first stocked into the system in 1966. Brown trout were introduced in 1977 and have established a self-sustaining wild population. The Little Red River is home to the current 4-pound test line class world record brown trout of 40 pounds, 4 ounces caught in 1992.

Management Plan
In 2006, the AGFC Trout Management Program began developing a comprehensive management plan for the tailwater. The purpose of this plan is to establish specific goals and objectives, which will guide future management of this fishery. Central to the plan development process was an intensive public involvement effort used to help ensure the desires and expectations of the angling public were embodied goals. In 2012, this plan will be revisited to determine if management objectives were met and to ensure that plan goals are still in line with public values and interests.


Lake Greeson Tailwater

The tailwater between Narrows Dam on the Little Missouri River to low-water bridge at Muddy Fork Road is stocked to provide anglers in southwest Arkansas the opportunity to fish for trout.


Norfork Lake Tailwater

Background
Norfork Dam is on the North Fork of the White River in Baxter County. The dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. Construction of the dam was completed in 1944. Operations from the project created coldwater habitat unsuitable for native fish. The possibility of establishing a trout fishery was investigated with the experimental stocking of 600 fingerling rainbow trout in 1948. Brown trout were introduced in 1949, and by the early 1950s the Norfork was becoming known throughout the area for its trout fishing. The AGFC manages trout fisheries in the North Fork of the White River from Norfork Dam to its confluence with the White River.

Management Plan
In 2007, the AGFC Trout Management Program began developing a comprehensive management plan for both the Norfork and Bull Shoals tailwaters. The purpose of this plan is to establish specific goals and objectives, which will guide future management of the trout fisheries in these waters. Central to the plan development process was an intensive public involvement effort used to help ensure that the desires and expectations of the angling public were embodied. In 2013, this plan will be revisited to determine if management objectives were met and to ensure plan goals are still in line with public values and interests.


Ouachita River Tailwaters

Background
The tailwaters below Blakely, Carpenter, and Remmel dams on the Ouachita River are stocked seasonally to provide anglers in the southern part of the state with the opportunity to fish for trout. Catchable rainbow trout are stocked from November through April to take advantage of cooler water temperatures.


Spring River

Background
The Spring River originates from Mammoth Spring in Fulton County, Arkansas. The spring flows 9 million gallons of water hourly at a constant 58 degrees Fahrenheit. The AGFC manages the uppermost 12.1 miles of the Spring River from Dam 1 to the mouth of Myatt Creek as a trout fishery.